MESOAMERICAN BIOLOGICAL CORRIDORS PROJECT. SELVA MAYA PRIORITY AREA REPORT, PRELIMINARY DRAFT, BELIZE.

Avella, E. and Herrera, A. and Boles, E. (2000) MESOAMERICAN BIOLOGICAL CORRIDORS PROJECT. SELVA MAYA PRIORITY AREA REPORT, PRELIMINARY DRAFT, BELIZE. Technical Report.

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    Abstract

    In the context of natural resource management and conservation within the Central American region, Belize occupies the enviable position of having the highest percentage of land under some form of protection. With 40% of the total land area under protection and a national policy to maintain biological diversity and integrity, it is easy to understand why Belize is well regarded by regional and international conservationist. It is also easy for us to become complacent that critical vegetation types and endangered animal communities are well represented in these protected areas. The reality however, may be different from the perception. It is well established through research that ecosystems do not function in isolation. Further uncontrolled development is likely to produce fragmentations and ecological “islands” within modified habitats, thereby compromising the ability of the protected areas to safeguard this biodiversity. To monitor this situation it is always a useful exercise to periodically take stock of the conditions on the ground especially as they relate to the maintenance of the priority areas and their corridor linkages. Updating the information database on the priority areas is especially relevant in the context of the regional and sub regional ecological framework and will assist in the preparation of the strategic plan for the Mesoamerican Biological Corridors Project (MBCP). As the Mesoamerican Biological Corridors Project takes root and moves from the realm of being a mere concept to a workable reality it is necessary to take stock of the critical issues which impact the future viability of these areas. These include the environmental, institutional and socioeconomic issues. A well meaning corridor linkage program must take into account the very important role that private and public lands play in maintaining vital corridor linkages, apart from their other roles of protecting watersheds and providing habitats for a host of important flora and fauna. These protected areas and multiple use landscapes are challenging us with the idea that critical linkage areas can serve the dual purpose of providing a range of economic benefits while protecting ecological processes. The Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area (RBCMA) has been managed with the intent of developing sustainable approaches to land use that deliver economic returns, but are also compatible with the long term preservation of the cultural heritage, biodiversity and environmental attributes of the area. The site is a virtual laboratory for sustainable land use approaches that can be transferred over the wider landscape and throughout the region. The and is privately owned and administered by a non-governmental organization (Programme for Belize) with the concurrence of the Government of Belize and held in trust for the people of Belize under a Memorandum of Agreement.

    Item Type: Technical Reports (Technical Report)
    Related URLs:
      Keywords: corridors, nature reserve, selva maya, vegetation
      Subjects: (A) Biodiversity > (AB) Birds
      (A) Biodiversity > (AC) Fish > (ACA) Freshwater
      (C) Ecosystems > (CC) Terrestrial > (CCA) Broad-Leaved Forest
      (C) Ecosystems > (CC) Terrestrial > (CCB) Savanna
      (C) Ecosystems > (CC) Terrestrial > (CCC) Wetlands
      (H) Protected Areas > (HG) Nature Reserve
      (I) Socio-Economic Information > (IA) Economic Impacts
      Publication Sources: (3) Other Source > (3D) Other or Unspecified
      Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2010 08:31
      Last Modified: 13 Aug 2015 08:48
      URI: http://eprints.uberibz.org/id/eprint/30

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