ECOLOGICAL STATUS OF BELIZE’s SOUTHERN REEF SYSTEMS - Impacts of Hurricane Iris

Bood, N.D (2001) ECOLOGICAL STATUS OF BELIZE’s SOUTHERN REEF SYSTEMS - Impacts of Hurricane Iris. Technical Report.

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    Abstract

    The Belize Barrier Reef Complex, the second largest in the world and the largest in the Western Hemisphere, is one of the most significant ecosystems in the tropical western Atlantic. Extending for 220 km along Belize’s coast, it encompasses an approximate area of 22,800 km² as a unique assemblage of lagoon patch reefs, fringing reefs, faroes and offshelf atolls (Kramer et al., 2000). This diverse and well-developed reef ecosystem represents the last extensive and flourishing reef environment in the Caribbean (Wildes 1992) and has also been rated among the best developed in the world. The reefs of Belize, however, have been recently experiencing an increased frequency and intensity of disturbances. A prime example of these types of disturbances is hurricanes. Within the past four years, Belize has been impacted by a total of four hurricanes. The most recent of these is Hurricane Iris, a category 4 storm that hit the southern coast of Belize on October 8th, 2001.

    Item Type: Technical Reports (Technical Report)
    Related URLs:
      Publisher: Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute
      Subjects: (C) Ecosystems > (CB) Marine > (CBA) Coral Reefs
      (H) Protected Areas > (HD) Marine Reserve
      Publication Sources: (3) Other Source > (3A) Government Departments
      Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2010 10:34
      Last Modified: 20 Jan 2011 14:50
      URI: http://eprints.uberibz.org/id/eprint/13

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